Dundee Derby

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Intro

FC: I’m joined this evening by Ross Kilvington. Ross has written for, This Is Ibrox, Forgotten Clubs and many other publications, as well as our own here at The North section. Looking forward to that’s one, two articles, which have contributed to the website, and they’re in the kind of past year and 2020, and the saw articles came to be in capped at a thousand words a sort of a good opportunity to actually actually just do a podcast and go a bit more, a bit more in depth into them.

RK: That’s a good point because some of the Jim McLean stuff you could write a book on that guy. I suppose with this you’ve got the kind of limit it at some stage, but now we get to go more in-depth on both articles and just have a chat with the Derby in general.

FC: How did you get into football?

RK: By accident. I’ve always worked to a goal and obviously started reading These Football Times in the past couple of years. So I thought, why not just give it a go as it’s subjective, so no one can, can tell you you’re wrong. It’s just the case of bettering yourself and becoming a better writer. And so after I got some encouragement from a few already. “Just write a piece and just see what happens.”

So I remember coming home from work on Friday and I sat at my laptop, and I wrote about my experiences of Scotland at France ’98. It was about 1,000 words, and anyone can do it if you just got that mentality. So that was it, and then it just basically snowballed from there.

FC:
So you picked up the articles, which I gave you pretty well. You studied in Dundee, when you came to study in Dundee, did you just commute or did you come to live in Dundee for a period?

RK: I just commuted. I’m not gonna lie, I’m a bit of a home bird so I didn’t want move. I know that you can miss out on some of the nightlife and stuff, but, and then kind of go out. I just got to train up every day. So when they’re 45 minutes from Kirkcaldy, so it wasn’t a far, and obviously on the train can, you could read and stuff and whatever else. But yeah, it was five years and I made some good friends, friends from kind of both sides of the Derby divided as well. So it was always good in that regard.

FC: Did your perception of the Derby change, as you kinda got to know these people and get to know, you know, a bit more about the kind of idiosyncrasies of the Derby and things like that?

RK: I knew it was big before coming up to Dundee on a regular basis. I just don’t think I knew exactly big it was. That was until you meet people who have supported either club for a certain period of time. I’m obviously being a bit bias here but the Old Firm is probably one of the biggest derbies in the world. But Dundee / Dundee United fans may say it’s one of the biggest in Britain, and some folk may laugh at that, but I genuinely think it is, yes, it’s the same City and they are only, what, a hundred years away from each other, but again, that’s like in another thing I highlighted in the the McLean article. So course together. It just makes it more special if that makes sense.

FC: Yeah, it definitely has that kind of feel to it. I wouldn’t go as far to say as kind of an Everton / Liverpool sort of a thing, but there’s a definite closeness kinda between the clubs. That said, there’s an intensity to it, but, obviously there was a period quite recently as well, where there was no Old Firm in the Scottish Premier League. And there was no Edinburgh Derby when Hearts and Hibs had both went down. So that actually was for a time to kind of plumb your diabetes, Scotland. I also love love debt when, uh, last season when they were pulled from the Championship and BBC Scotland on Friday nights, uh, I thought that was a good entertainment, obviously more time for the partners to get bevy to as well. Um, but, but the, the, you know, the other Seattle’s games was crack and yeah, obviously United got promoted, but, uh, that was a good period for the derby as well, in terms of entertainment value.

RK: Yeah. Theyre’s someone that I said it’s gonna mess. And then as, as you said, that’s a couple of seasons, been clubs were kind of in-between divisions. And I remember a hunger, to draw and the season done, didn’t go get it done. I remember watching it and I thought this is going to, so it was a really good game. And to me, what to not afford is about on like a hops habits from the, and hubs games, like asking this seem over the last few years, a couple of exceptions, but I’ve never really kind of taken off to me compared to like all of a sudden I’ve done detox and I can recall my bias there, but I just watched or not done the I’m sure there was one last season, a bit of man, but as well. And I think I said six to e

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FC: I’m joined this evening by Ross Kilvington. Ross has written for, This Is Ibrox, Forgotten Clubs and many other publications, as well as our own here at The North section. Looking forward to that’s one, two articles, which have contributed to the website, and they’re in the kind of past year and 2020, and the saw articles came to be in capped at a thousand words a sort of a good opportunity to actually actually just do a podcast and go a bit more, a bit more in depth into them. 

RK: That’s a good point because some of the Jim McLean stuff you could write a book on that guy. I suppose with this you’ve got the kind of limit it at some stage, but now we get to go more in-depth on both articles and just have a chat with the Derby in general.

FC: How did you get into football? 

RK: By accident. I’ve always worked to a goal and obviously started reading These Football Times in the past couple of years. So I thought, why not just give it a go as it’s subjective, so no one can, can tell you you’re wrong. It’s just the case of bettering yourself and becoming a better writer. And so after I got some encouragement from a few already. “Just write a piece and just see what happens.”

So I remember coming home from work on Friday and I sat at my laptop, and I wrote about my experiences of Scotland at France ’98. It was about 1,000 words, and anyone can do it if you just got that mentality. So that was it, and then it just basically snowballed from there. 

FC: 
So you picked up the articles, which I gave you pretty well. You studied in Dundee, when you came to study in Dundee, did you just commute or did you come to live in Dundee for a period? 

RK: I just commuted. I’m not gonna lie, I’m a bit of a home bird so I didn’t want move. I know that you can miss out on some of the nightlife and stuff, but, and then kind of go out. I just got to train up every day. So when they’re 45 minutes from Kirkcaldy, so it wasn’t a far, and obviously on the train can, you could read and stuff and whatever else. But yeah, it was five years and I made some good friends, friends from kind of both sides of the Derby divided as well. So it was always good in that regard. 

FC: Did your perception of the Derby change, as you kinda got to know these people and get to know, you know, a bit more about the kind of idiosyncrasies of the Derby and things like that? 

RK: I knew it was big before coming up to Dundee on a regular basis. I just don’t think I knew exactly big it was. That was until you meet people who have supported either club for a certain period of time. I’m obviously being a bit bias here but the Old Firm is probably one of the biggest derbies in the world. But Dundee / Dundee United fans may say it’s one of the biggest in Britain, and some folk may laugh at that, but I genuinely think it is, yes, it’s the same City and they are only, what, a hundred years away from each other, but again, that’s like in another thing I highlighted in the the McLean article. So course together. It just makes it more special if that makes sense. 

FC: Yeah, it definitely has that kind of feel to it. I wouldn’t go as far to say as kind of an Everton / Liverpool sort of a thing, but there’s a definite closeness kinda between the clubs. That said, there’s an intensity to it, but, obviously there was a period quite recently as well, where there was no Old Firm in the Scottish Premier League. And there was no Edinburgh Derby when Hearts and Hibs had both went down. So that actually was for a time to kind of plumb your diabetes, Scotland. I also love love debt when, uh, last season when they were pulled from the Championship and BBC Scotland on Friday nights, uh, I thought that was a good entertainment, obviously more time for the partners to get bevy to as well. Um, but, but the, the, you know, the other Seattle’s games was crack and yeah, obviously United got promoted, but, uh, that was a good period for the diabetes as well, in terms of entertainment value. 

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